Loc8r

Self-charging Bike Tracking System
Winning Project at Hack the North, September 2017
Devpost | Github

My team and I designed a solution to bike theft, which is rampant in every city and on every university campus. Our solution is a GPS-enabled module which communicates with a server and transmits the location of the bicycle at a set interval. The owner can view the location on an app using the Google Maps API. The entire module charges whenever someone pedals, ensuring that it doesn't run out of battery at a critical time.

The photo displays our functional prototype.

Loc8r

DBot

3D Printer
Operational November 2017

I built a highly modified version of the DBot 3D Printer from scratch. Some main features are as follows:

    300 x 300 x 300 mm Print Volume (12" x 12" x 12")
    32-bit processor allowing for extremely high speeds (Smoothieboard)
    Full web interface and a phone app, no USB connection required
    Automatic 9-point bed levelling with on-the-fly correction while printing
    Stable print speeds of up to 120 mm/s, thanks to an E3D Volcano and a very rigid metal frame.
    All-metal nozzle and heated bed - compatible with a wide range of filaments including ABS and PETG
The photo displays the printer as it is now. It is a constant work in progress, as I add improvements whenever I have time to work on it.

DBot

Milano

Sumobot
Won the McMaster University Sumobot Advanced Competition 2017

I was part of a team of 4 rookies that built an autonomous robot to compete in the competition mentioned above. We won the competition, losing only 1 match (2-1) in the group stages. Some features and specs of the Milano :

    20 cm x 20 cm size limit (no height constraint)
    3 kg weight limit
    Dual Arduino setup for low latency
    Tank-like soft tread design for maximum grip
    Dual 60W brushed motors
    3S 5000 mAh Lithium Polymer battery
    Baby Groot Mascot
    Dual Ultrasonic Sensors for directional detection
We intended to use ramps to defend and attack - preventing the opponent from gripping the arena. Due to the size of our motors and battery, we had to get inventive with the ramps. Hence, the ramps are stored vertically to pass the size constraint. At the beginning of the match, the Bot "wiggles," causing the ramps to drop down and protect the bot.

Two Arduinos were used to reduce the execution time of the loop and improve responsiveness. The "slave" collected data from each of the 7 sensors, and sent them over serial to the "master," which then sent a signal to the motors accordingly.

Milano

This section of the website is under construction. More projects will be added soon!
Yet to come: